Color Me Bad, Crayola Eliminates a Color — Automakers Take Notice

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Stephan Franklin, Auto Show Global

Word on the street is that Crayola the crayon manufacturer is eliminating a color from its 24 color pack line. While I’m sure that this is causing some anxiety somewhere, I wish the automotive companies would take a cue. I have some recommendations of my own of colors that need to get the axe:

  • Only five shades of Silver please
  • No Green of any shade, particularly Lime Green
  • Mauve, enough said
  • Anything that is a shade of sorbet
  • Flesh tones
  • Robin Egg Blue
  • 1960’s household appliance colors
  • Split Pea Soup

If you have any other suggestions, email them to autoshowglobal@gmail.com.

The Longest Mile

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Stephan Franklin Auto Show Global

Automakers are in the process of trying to coax the new head of the EPA to reduce the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards for vehicles for 2025, that were put into place by former president Barack Obama. I’m not going to go into a long drawn out explanation of the rules and the history of CAFÉ standards and the struggle of the automakers. What may or may not happen possibly could create all stakeholders involved, particularly the consumer and the automakers.

New technology costs money which is gladly passed to the consumer. Convenience costs money, and consumers have proven that they are willing to pay for it. With the plethora of new SUVs and crossovers revealed over the last year by the automakers, it doesn’t appear that there is any Intention of meeting the 2025 CAFÉ deliverable. The major component in the face regulation average involves production. To meet the CAFE average, (X) number of total vehicles produced must meet the average the set by the government. For example, a company produces 100 hybrids that gets 100 mpg and 100 SUV’s that get 20mpg, the average is 60mpg.

Hello world, hybrids are not the cash cows. Cars aren’t selling at the rate everyone would like them to compare to SUV’s, and provide a lower profit margin than SUV’s and pick-up trucks. CAFÉ standards are still based on what’s produced, not sold. That like cooking dinner for 100 people when only 4 people live in the house, you are eating the cost as well as the food. Currently, most automakers are making good money, and are making what sells. This new target may ultimately threaten the bottom line for automakers, which will drive up vehicle cost to the consumer. No one is letting go of a tree, to stand on Capitol Hill and protest the regulations. I’m not sure how much lobbying is going to have to be done to move the needle, but the money talks and the automakers are going to pay one way or another, but who really pays for the longest mile.

2017 Geneva International Motor Show

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Stephan Franklin, Auto Show Global

The Geneva Auto Show is the premiere auto show in Europe. This year there were more than 40 global debuts in the Palexpo convention center. The rest of the displays were products that were revealed at the other major shows from Detroit, Chicago, and Los Angeles. Geneva, Switzerland has no automotive companies in its backyard yet is one of the most influential shows on the global circuit. Of course, the media buzz was diminished from some of the reveals since a lot of press announcements came weeks before the show. Manufacturers such as Mercedes, released a slew of new products to the media two weeks prior to the show, particularly the AMG product line.Historically speaking, most of the luxury brands and high end companies such as Rolls Royce, or McLaren, participate in this show, and forgo some of the North American ones. In most cases, the products that are being revealed don’t necessarily have a strong market in the U.S. or the product isn’t available for mass export. Supercars like the new McLaren 720S debuted, but won’t see the North American circuit. Even this year, the global media took notice that the displays of some high-end automobiles were down from years past. It is believed between longer vehicle development cycles, and show production cost, it has been more cost effective to use the internet to unveil new products. Nonetheless, the media seems to be impressed with the showings and are looking forward to more North American reveals at New York, in April.